Gwen Stefani and Pharrell Williams will be responsible for the plagiarism


Гвен Стефани и Фаррелл Уильямс ответят за плагиат

Singer Pharrell Williams is known for his successful collaborations, another of which was the hit single “Spark the fire”, recorded a duet with Gwen Stefani.

New product of collaboration between these two artists, who has already recorded songs together, liked the audience and shocked one hairdresser named Richard Morrill. According to stylist, Gwen and Pharrell have attributed authorship of the song he wrote it.

Now discouraged by the arrogance and Stephanie Williams the wizard is planning to file lawsuits on the “Harajuku Lovers”(the company of Gwen Stefani), as well as the recording Studio “Interscope Records”. As compensation for the damage the hairdresser requires the payment of $ 25 million, which could significantly hit the pockets of stars.

Specify that Morrill is not just a stylist who occasionally writes songs. Richard in the distant ‘ 80s he was in a metal band L. A. P. D, for which he wrote the repertoire.

Well, let’s see whether the male to defend the truth.

Recall that for Farrell’s trial about plagiarism gradually become a habit. Previously Williams and Robin Thicke accused of plagiarism of the song “Got to Give it Up” is known in the ‘ 70s, singer Martin Gaya.

Then the jury listened to the prosecution expert, who assessed how similar or different compositions, and decided that Farrell and Tik guilty. Musicians had to pay compensation in the amount of $ 7.3 million.

Of this amount, $ 4 million is a fine for copyright infringement, while the remaining profit which was received by the TEC and Williams from the use of “Blurred Lines” global multimedia companies.

“The jury made a strong impression when the plaintiff left the sound of one song to another, and they almost completely matched to the rhythm and music, “said California radio station KPCC.

Of course, this verdict did not suit the musicians and they decided to appeal. The cancellation of the decision was denied, but the judge got this time more accommodating and decided that instead of 7.3 million Farrell and Robin will have to pay only 5.3 million, as well as to pay the family of GAA half of the future profits of an exercise or stream the song.